“If The Well Is Poisoned”: Graeme Macrae Burnet’s “His Bloody Project”

His Bloody ProjectIn response to my review of Eileen, I was directed on Twitter to an interview with Ottessa Moshfegh in the Guardian. In it, she offered her thoughts on the interaction between crime fiction and her latest novel: “most people who pick up a book labelled ‘thriller’ or ‘mystery’ may not be expecting to confront troubling ideas about women in society.” This has raised eyebrows from a genre that has in truth done rather a lot of work in this regard: isn’t it remarkable that a literary author is rewarded with a place on the Booker shortlist for appropriating not just a generic mode, but the very work it has done in the areas that the self-same author chooses to disparage?

Well, perhaps Graeme Macrae Burnet can help. His Bloody Project has won its place on the shortlist whilst also being actually marketed as a crime novel. That is, this is no literary jeu d’esprit, no smash n’ grab raid on a genre from which it would prefer to maintain a snooty distance. It is a gritty, often graphic novel set in 1869, and the triple murder which is its focus takes place in the small hamlet of Culduie in the Highlands. From the novel’s first page, we are under no doubt of the perpetrator: Roderick Macrae, a seventeen-year-old crofter’s son, makes no bones of his culpability. The novel, however, very much does.

His Bloody Project is, if you like, a whydunnit, a crime novel which locates its mystery not in the mechanics of a murder but its metaphysics – it is obsessed with morality and mores, with the reasons that Roderick Macrae becomes a murderer, rather than with how he endeavours to get away with it. In other words, “what is at issue are not the facts of the case, but the contents of the perpetrator’s mind” [p. 250]. But take a look at the page number in those brackets: this is a 280-page novel which opens with the contention that “the evidence of his deeds does not speak of a sound mind” [p. 9], and so near its close is still circling the same subject is a curious beast.

The novel comprises several sections, made up of fictional documents the author pretends to have discovered in the archives. The longest of these is the testament of Macrae himself, supposedly composed at his advocate’s urging in the dank of an Inverness cell. This is easily the best part of the novel – it captures wonderfully the voice of a young man both keenly intelligent and horribly naive, with impressive powers of comprehension but little self-awareness. It also introduces the reader in mulchy detail to a crofting community, presenting not just the feudalism which powers it but the mindsets which prolong it. When Roderick’s father finally breaks under the ceaseless harassment of Culduie’s constable, Lachlan Broad, and complains to the laird’s administrator, he is given a lecture on the way of the world:

You are labouring under a misapprehension, Mr Macrae. […] If you do not take the crops from your neighbour’s land, it is not because a regulation forbids it. You do not steal his crops, because it would be wrong to do so. The reason you may not “see” the regulations is because there are no regulations, at least not in the way you seem to think. You might as well ask to see the air we breathe. Of course, there are regulations, but you cannot see them. The regulations exist because we all accept that they exist and without them there would be anarchy. It is for the village constable to interpret these regulations and to enforce them at his discretion. [p. 102]

That our modern state, and the Glasgow that exists in the world of the novel as an unimaginably distant separate planet of opportunity and luxury, are instead governed by written laws and codes ultimately makes very little difference in the course of the novel, and it’s here that its circularity finds its intended profundity. “We have heard, as we should, a great deal of discussion of the motives for these wicked crimes,” summarises a judge at the close of the novel, “but having been pronounced guilty, these motives are of no consequence” [p. 274].   In other words, once we agree that a thing is the case, all detail – any further demand for corroboration – is extraneous.

His Bloody Project thus bombards us with detail. In doing so, however, it abandons confidence in itself. In the section which purports to be Macrae’s testimony, it is quite possible to read all the devilish details between the lines: the young man’s dangerous mix of precociousness and innocence, the disconnect between his understandings and the world of the doctors and lawyers he encounters at the prison; those events in the village which conspire to create the circumstances for the triple murder he commits but which remain more or less invisible to him. Despite this skilful writing, the rest of the novel – and ultimately its bulk – is made up of witness statements rather too cute in their disagreements (“John Macrae is among the most devoted to scripture in his parish,” insists the village minister on page ten, and immediately on page eleven the schoolmaster insists he was “a reticent and slow-witted individual”); of a fictional work by a historical criminologist (“was it happenstance that put a croman in your hand?” [p. 171]); and, most difficult of all, of a recreation of the trial supposedly drawn from newspaper reports and court records (“The Clerk of the Court then read the indictment” and so on [p. 191]). These sections make explicit all the subtlety of Macrae’s testimony, but adds very little – indeed, rather detracts – from the plaintive mood of the novel, the cleverness of its characterisation and even the authenticity of its mise en scene.

Ultimately, in adding all this extra material, Burnet inevitably comes to focus on process as much as personality – and in so doing renders his novel a little less exciting than it might otherwise have been. It’s unreliable narrator recedes, hemmed in as by the walls of his cell by the paper combats that surround him. Perhaps that’s the point; but, just as Eileen felt less unusual that it believed itself to be, so His Bloody Project comes to read rather more like all those otheir ambiguous courtroom dramas you’ve read or watched.  At one point, Roderick listens to his advocate speak at length about the case, and concludes that “in his mania to employ his great cleverness he quite disregarded the most obvious fact” [p. 85]. Like Sinclair, Burnet had the kernel of a compelling narrative; and like Macrae’s advocate, it could be argued he over-embellished it.

That said, His Bloody Project remains a memorable, and pungent, read: its commitment in particular to the Highlands setting, and the opportunities this affords to make some interesting arguments about class and justice, give it a currency quite beyond its structural hiccups. “Why do such [bad] things happen?” one character asks of Roderick long before he becomes a murderer. “I hesitated for a moment,” he remembers, “and then said, ‘I would say that they happen for no reason'” [pp. 87-8]. He’s wrong, though not for the reasons he or we might first think; and the novel shows us – as well as sometimes less effectively telling us – why.

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2 thoughts on ““If The Well Is Poisoned”: Graeme Macrae Burnet’s “His Bloody Project”

  1. Pingback: “Community-cum-Lepar Colony”: Paul Beatty’s “The Sellout” | @Number 71
  2. Pingback: “Multiple and Conflicting Answers”: Madeleine Thien’s “Do Not Say We Have Nothing” | @Number 71

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